“DAUGHTERS OF THE DRAGON” By William Andrews, a Review by Joan Adamak

An historical fiction story that haunts the reader.

This book is one of the finest books I have read in a long time.  It is a tragic and triumphant telling of the atrocities that over 200,000 Korean women (usually young teenage girls) had to endure at the hands of Japanese soldiers during WWII.  At this time, Korea was subject to Japan and its soldiers and were helpless to deal with the situation. In this particular Korean family, the mother was sent to work long hours in a factory producing for the Japanese;, the father was taken by the Japanese and made to fight for them  where he died; and Ja-hee, age 14, and her sister were told they were to work in a boot factory.  When they got there, they joined other teenage Korean girls who were forced to be sex slaves for the Japanese military and treated in the most vicious manners possible.  During war times, soldiers quite often become immune to human suffering and take out on the weaker their anger, and women most often are picked up and put into brothels or such and bear the brunt of this anger.

This story tells of those times, what happened to these girls, what public opinion was about them by Koreans, Japanese and American soldiers at the end of the war and how Korean split into North and South because of political division.  Ja-Hee, using her intelligence, struggled to survive, including finding her sister after she believed she had been dead over sixty years.

This story is well written, the dialogue is emotional and believable and the scenes are so well depicted, it is like the reader is there.

This e-book was given to me as a complimentary copy for an honest review.

 

Advertisements

About R & D Blog & Website Development

Blog Master of The Authors Club blog, Webmaster of the Authors Club website, Blog master of the Nothing But Book Reviews and Nothing But Author's Interview's blogs. Webmaster of Deb's Delightful Designs jewelry website.
This entry was posted in Joan Adamak, Nothing But Book Reviews and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s